Women may make better professional beer tasters than men

In a Wall Street Journal article, the idea that women may make better beer tasters (primarily at the big industrial brewers where it’s vitally important that each batch taste the same as the previous thousands) is explored.

No glass ceiling for the best job in the world

At many companies, the assembled panelists would have been men, typically brew masters and other technical types. And it makes sense. To judge from TV commercials, men like beer better than women do and sometimes even seem to like beer more than they like women.

But the British company SABMiller PLC decided several years ago to reach deeper into its employee pool to find adept tasters, inviting marketers, secretaries and others to try their hand. The company concluded that women were drinking men under the table.

“We have found that females often are more sensitive about the levels of flavor in beer,” says Barry Axcell, SABMiller’s chief brewer. Women trained as tasters outshine their male counterparts, he says.

Honestly, this doesn’t surprise me at all. My wife has a much more sensitive nose than I do. (Which she reminds me of all of the time, often right before she reminds me to clean the cat boxes.) I often ask her to sniff a beer I’m sampling to see if she picks up something more subtle than I have been able to detect.

Women of the beerosphere: Melissa Cole

(Melissa blames an overflowing inbox for missing my original invitation. After looking at my own e-mail I can certainly sympathize.)

March is National Women’s History Month here in the United States. It is an annual celebration of women and their roles in history, sponsored by the National Women’s History Project. As with so much else, the realm of beer seems dominated by men. It is primarily men who are marketed to, primarily men who are the brewers and homebrewers, and primarily men who write about beer. But not entirely. The blogosphere is no different. So, to celebrate Women’s History Month, Hop Talk is taking time out to get to know some of these women.

Melissa Cole

What is your name?
Melissa Cole

What is your location?
London, UK

What is your blog?
www.girlsguidetobeer.blogspot.com

Do you have a favorite style of beer? What is it?
I don’t have one specific favourite style of beer and I’m always open to trying new ones!

How did you come to write a blog about beer?
I’m a professional journalist and a lot of my livelihood is writing about beer; the blog came out of a desire to express more opinions on the subject of beer and the issues surrounding it.

What prejudices have you had to overcome?
Very few, the brewing industry is a delightful place to work. Sadly, the attitude I find most depressing is that of bar staff or licensees when I send back a bad pint (always very, very politely) and then try and argue with me, often snapping a variation on ‘what do you know?’ making it clear that I’m just a ‘bird’ and therefore not entitled to an opinion on beer! I now rarely argue, I just walk out. I’m pleased to say this is less frequent now but it still infuriates me on the rare occasions it happens.

Any other passions?
I play cricket and love fishing, it’s the most relaxing pastime in the world!

Any parting thoughts?
Try anything once, never close your mind and drink more, and better, beer!

Melissa is a freelance food and drink writer and committee member of the British Guild of Beer Writers, as well as the author of A Girl’s Guide to Beer (RSS feed)

Women’s History Month re-cap

Thank you to all of the women who took the time to participate in our National Women’s History Month celebration here at Hop Talk. I, for one, appreciate their unique perspectives on beer and life. And, well, frankly I’m a little awed.

Jasmine, who also wrote about Dark beer

Boak, who wrote about attitudes towards women in British pubs

Teri Fahrendorf, who told us about the Pink Boots Society

Beer Molly

Carrie Miller, the Beer Pirate

Carolyn Smagalski, the Beer Fox, who waxed on about women, beer, history, and myths

Added:

Melissa Cole

Women and Beer – Wine or Liberation

March is National Women’s History Month here in the United States. It is an annual celebration of women and their roles in history, sponsored by the National Women’s History Project. As with so much else, the realm of beer seems dominated by men. It is primarily men who are marketed to, primarily men who are the brewers and homebrewers, and primarily men who write about beer. But not entirely. The blogosphere is no different. So, to celebrate Women’s History Month, Hop Talk is taking time out to get to know some of these women.

This is a guest article by Carolyn Smagalski, The Beer Fox.

Deep within the recesses of a woman’s mind lives a place of secrecy, one where fantasy mixes with a perception of her place in the world. She sees her various roles in life, and assigns levels of importance to each. As the weather starts to warm and the thawing earth begins to squish beneath her step, her nose detects aromas of wet, dry leaves and hyacinths – each pleasant in its own way, signaling a new beginning, a new year. Her anticipation of Spring’s natural beauty requires her to launch into a mission of meticulous landscaping, drinking in the aromas of earth, dirt, ivy, daffodil, tulip and lily. She savors the sweetness, but delights in farmland, animal-scents and bitter wafts that fill the air, as well.

This ritual is repeated in every corner of her life – the romantic and sexual relationship she enjoys with her partner; the way she nurtures her children; the order and attention she gives to her career; the ease with which she settles into social situations; the care she extends to matters of culinary excellence. The list is endless.

One thing remains clear. A woman has a broad capacity for enjoying and savoring the gifts of the earth. It is this very broad capacity that led her predecessors, as high priestesses in ancient Sumer, to the brewing of beer, and as royal empresses of ancient Rome, to the painting of their lips with the ambrosia of pungent wine. Woman revels in flavor, aroma, and the kinesthetic sensations surrounding food and drink. This makes her particularly adept at assessing and enjoying the delights of bière and wine.

I use the word bière, rather than beer, because a woman may display an unexplained sensitivity, even in her use of written language. She prefers the word truffle to mushroom, cuisine to food, and brochette to skewer, particularly when she is in the midst of a fine dining experience among her friends. She wants them to see her as savvy. Beer is a fine word for casual use, but she needs the complement of elegant grammar when lobster is laid elegantly upon a delicate sauce. She enjoys the hedonism associated with banal indulgence, and wants to feel wicked in a playful, yet innocent way. She abhors being thought of as “cheap,” and may reject the very act of drinking beer because of the image portrayed by so many beer marketers throughout our anthropological culture.

A woman is drawn to the image of wine as a “godly” drink. In Roman mythology, Bacchus was the god of wine and agriculture, while Dionysus ruled over that domain in Greece. In southern Italy, the Greek culture introduced the Bacchanalia circa 200 B.C., a celebration that was initially open to women only, and was held in the greatest secrecy. With the advent of the Christian rites, particularly the Catholic Church, wine was introduced into the most sacred part of the Mass, and continued in comfort as an “approved” beverage. Of course, the warmer climates of Italy and Greece produced grapes, so wine was abundant. The influence of the Roman Empire had spread throughout Europe, as did their customs – this was good for the Roman tradesman, and the custom continued.

Although monasteries grew their own grain and hops, and brewed beer that sustained monks throughout Lenten Fasts, women were excluded from this form of ceremony regarding beer. Rather, beer was the common beverage consumed by the masses (unpurified water was deadly). It therefore, did not form a parallel with the divine – the imaginative manifestations of Juno or Hera, for instance. Northern cultures in Scandinavia used beer in their sacred rituals, but the southern cultures regarded those unconquered tribes on the Northern Peninsulas as “barbarians.” Yet, when you survey Human Development Standards of the World for 2007-2008, those strong, Scandinavian countries have captured all the top spots – Iceland (#1), Norway (#2), Sweden (#6), Netherlands (#9), and Finland (#11). The USA ranks twelfth, Italy is 20th and Greece is 24th.

With more than 100 different styles of beer, mead and cider available throughout the world today, a woman would be hard-pressed to find nothing to her liking. Although many middle-aged women have seized the concept of directing their own lives and making their own decisions, the power of peer pressure still persists for a large segment of this demographic group. They cling to myths formed long ago:

Myth #1: One style is like all styles

Ladies, wake up! Some are light and champagne-like while others are sweet, dark, and malty. Still others are briskly hopped and have flavors of grapefruit, pine cones, or flowers. Sour Ale, Lambic, and Gueuze are intensely satisfying to a wine lover, while alcohol levels are often (but not always) lower than those found in beer.

Myth #2: Beer makes me sick and bloated

This complaint may be due to a sensitivity to congeners in dark, alcoholic beverages (beer, wine, or mixed drinks), and paler styles would be more easily tolerated and digested by their bodily systems. You may also have sensitivity to the glutens found in beer made with barley, wheat or rye. Gluten-free beer, brewed from sorghum, honey, quinoa, or chestnuts will give you a taste of the exotic, and blends well with meat, poultry and vegetables.

Myth #3: Only “cheap women” drink beer

A woman who is educated about beer and the many styles available globally never looks “cheap,” especially when she makes her choice with an air of confidence and NO apologies. Rather, she is a goddess to men who truly appreciate beer for its “taste.”

Myth #4: Beer clogs my nose

Some beers, particularly those with high hop levels, may cause stuffiness in those who suffer from hay fever. Choose beers that have little to no hops added, indicated by low IBU numbers – Berliner Weisse, Unblended Lambic, Gueuze – or expand into the realm of Mead, Cider and Perry.

This Beer Fox means no insult to middle-aged women. I merely singled out a segment of that group because this is where I see the most resistance to experimentation in beverage of choice. Younger women, particularly those in upscale, cosmopolitan areas, seem to be enamored with the buffet of styles at their fingertips. They are not content to ask their boyfriends or husbands what to order, and are forming peer groups – e.g., The In Pursuit of Ale Club in Philadelphia – for the exploration, education and enjoyment of beer in a non-judgmental, healthy environment. They have discovered the pleasure of true liberation. Osmotar would have been proud!

Carolyn is the Beer and Brewing editor at Bella Online (RSS feed)

Read Hop Talk’s interview of The Beer Fox

Dark beer

March is National Women’s History Month here in the United States. It is an annual celebration of women and their roles in history, sponsored by the National Women’s History Project. As with so much else, the realm of beer seems dominated by men. It is primarily men who are marketed to, primarily men who are the brewers and homebrewers, and primarily men who write about beer. But not entirely. The blogosphere is no different. So, to celebrate Women’s History Month, Hop Talk is taking time out to get to know some of these women.

This is a guest article by Jasmine.

The other night I was out at a brewpub with a large group of friends. After the waitress had delivered our beer, the guy sitting across from me offered his wife a sip of his beer.

“No way,” she said. “I don’t like dark beer.”

This was a woman who, until now, had shown good taste in beer, joyfully trying a new Belgian beer on tap. I wanted to stand on my chair and shout, “Really? ALL dark beers?”

Isn’t that like declaring you don’t like green food? No broccoli, beans, kiwifruit, or rosemary? You’ve tried every single green food in the world and declared it lacking? Somehow, I don’t believe you.

I understand dark beer can be scary. They appear heavy and hard to drink. There’s a chance that it’s bitter, at stoutleast to a degree, and a better chance that it has enough alcohol in it to knock you off your barstool.

But I have two words for you: coffee and chocolate. If you like either of those, there is a dark beer out there for you. Dark beer comes in as many styles as light beer, and can be even lighter tasting than some of their yellow counterparts.

Point in case: Lagunitas’ Cappuccino Stout. It has the same creamy taste and feel as a cappuccino, with just a hint of espresso bitterness. It pours black like coffee (yes, in this case there is actually coffee in it), but has that malty caramel smell and even nut and chocolate flavors in the taste. With 7.99% alcohol, it borders on knock-down strong.

But even that might be too bitter for some non-coffee drinkers (there are some of you left out there?). In that case, try Firestone-Walker’s Reserve Porter. It’s far sweeter, with a strong chocolate taste. I once made an ice cream float out of this (not kidding) and it was amazing. It really brought out the chocolate flavors, almost like chocolate syrup.

Then, of course, there is the classic: Guinness. If anyone tries to serve it to you warm, or knowingly tells you it SHOULD be warm, roll your eyes and walk away. Guinness only has around 200 calories a glass (an often-quoted figure recently, since that’s less than a Bud Light) for those who feel like dark beer is too heavy. A pint draught of Guinness averages only 4.2% alcohol, too, so you can drink it all night. It doesn’t have a lot of carbonation, giving it that smooth and creamy taste.

Of course, not all dark beers are like dessert. I’d caution the casual drinker against Bison Brewery’s Chocolate Stout. Fiercely bitter, like unsweetened baking chocolate, it’s hard to drink a lot of and hard to pair with food. They actually put cocoa powder right in the mash. If you’re the kind of person who takes your morning caffeine as a tiny cup of espresso instead of watery coffee, however, or if you get annoyed by all that wheaty-hoppy-honey junk, this could be your beer. It doesn’t mess around.

To find these favorite of mine, I had to try a lot of beer that didn’t work for me first. At the last Great American Beer Festival, for example, Moylan’s took home a gold medal for their Dry Irish Stout. When I tried it, I couldn’t even finish a tiny sampler glass. Far too bitter for me, it made me feel like the saliva in my mouth was being stripped away. But because of the medal, I assume it’s not the beer. Someone, actually many someones, out there must love it. This might lead me to declare that I don’t like Dry Irish Stouts, but I would never declare that. Not until I’ve tried every single one.

Jasmine is half of the writing team at Beer at Joe’s (RSS feed)

Read Hop Talk’s interview of Jasmine

I’ll have a half of Pride and no funny looks please

March is National Women’s History Month here in the United States. It is an annual celebration of women and their roles in history, sponsored by the National Women’s History Project. As with so much else, the realm of beer seems dominated by men. It is primarily men who are marketed to, primarily men who are the brewers and homebrewers, and primarily men who write about beer. But not entirely. The blogosphere is no different. So, to celebrate Women’s History Month, Hop Talk is taking time out to get to know some of these women.

This is a guest article by Boak.

Attitudes towards women who drink can sometimes seem a little Victorian. One of the areas where this is plainest is if you try to go to the pub on your own.

If you’re lucky, you might just get a strange look (particularly when you order an ale). If you’re unlucky, a wise-guy at the bar might decide that what you really need is a bit of company. Doesn’t matter if you’ve got a paper, if it’s clearly obvious you don’t want to chat. Once one of these jokers starts, there’s nothing you can really do to get rid of them other than tell them to go away. At which point, if you’re really lucky, you get one of the “ooh, time of the month is it / lesbian are you” school of comments.

Annoyingly, it’s often the little “traditional” pubs that sound so great which are the worst. I was in Brighton last summer, and had an hour to kill before meeting some friends. I thought it would be great to try the Evening Star, an outlet for the wonderful Dark Star brewery. Great pub, shame about the clientele. I had to leave after one drink, as one moron, egged on by his mates, would not leave me alone.

Now I hasten to add at this point that I don’t make a habit of drinking on my own, but when I’m waiting for a friend, why shouldn’t I go into the pub to wait? I used to travel a lot for business – is it that weird to want to avoid the gloomy hotel room and go out for a swift one, especially if there’s some nice brews to try?

I bet if you’re a bloke and a beer geek, you wouldn’t think twice. But it has to be a really special brewery for me to do it these days, at least in the UK. For some reason, they seem to be more civilised in Germany. How is it in the US?

Boak is half of the writing team at boakandbailey.com (RSS feed)

Read Hop Talk’s interview of Boak

Women of the beerosphere: Carolyn Smagalski

March is National Women’s History Month here in the United States. It is an annual celebration of women and their roles in history, sponsored by the National Women’s History Project. As with so much else, the realm of beer seems dominated by men. It is primarily men who are marketed to, primarily men who are the brewers and homebrewers, and primarily men who write about beer. But not entirely. The blogosphere is no different. So, to celebrate Women’s History Month, Hop Talk is taking time out to get to know some of these women.

Carolyn Smagalski

What is your name?
Carolyn Smagalski, The Beer Fox

What is your location?
Cyberspace:
http://beer.bellaonline.com
http://www.phillybeergeek.com
http://www.glutenfreebeerfestival.com
http://www.cqwebwide.com
Earth:
Harleysville, PA – 25 miles northwest of Monk’s Café, the best Belgian Beer Bar in the country.

What is your blog?
http://beer.bellaonline.com
I write the Beer & Brewing site at www.BellaOnline.com . BellaOnline is the second largest website for women on the Internet, with over 400 categories of interest to women. My site – Beer & Brewing – had 3,000 page views per month when I started writing in December of 2004. It now draws nearly
57,000 page views per month, where I have written over 500 articles and newsletters about Beer & Brewing on that website alone.

http://www.phillybeergeek.com
In conjunction with Jason Harris of Keystone Homebrew Supply in Southeastern Pennsylvania, we have created Philly Beer Geek, in celebration of Philly Beer Week – March 7-March 16, 2008. We will hold the 1st Annual Philly Beer Geek Finals Competition on March 13, 2008 – with over $1,000 in prizes for the winner.

http://www.glutenfreebeerfestival.com
I am the advisor to the Gluten Free Beer Festival in the United Kingdom, and have contributed several articles about Gluten Free Beer for those with Celiac Disease, an intolerance to the protein fractions in barley, wheat, oats, rye, spelt, kamut and triticale.

http://www.cqwebwide.com
I also write a website on communication, (both internal and external), for success. It explores business basics, adversity, goal setting, creative imagination, taking action, and the like, and offers solutions for better communication on the Internet.

Do you have a favorite style of beer? What is it?
I am a certified beer judge with the BJCP, and enjoy judging Specialty Beer because the range of flavors and styles is so diverse. These beers expose me to the newest emerging styles – those on the cutting edge in the expanding universe of beer, and I derive great pleasure from the imaginative creativity of the brewers.

Other styles that bring particular pleasure to my palate are sour ales, IPA’s, saison, English Pale Ale, Roggenbier, Russian Imperial Stout, and Wood Aged Beer.

How did you come to write a blog about beer?
In my “proper” job, I coordinate printing and distribution for a number of nationally distributed magazines. At one point, I decided I wanted to expand my life, but didn’t know what capabilities I had. Since I had been cooking for years, I decided to write a cook book. I quickly realized that I needed a unique selling point, so I decided to add beer to the recipes (I noticed a lot of people seemed to like beer. I was a wine drinker, and did not drink beer at the time.) Pennsylvania is a case state, but I wanted to use all different micros in the recipes. I wrote to over 100 breweries across the US and Canada, asking them to send me 2 bottles of beer so I could test my recipes. They did, and I began a rollercoaster ride of cooking every weekend, inviting people from 21 to 81 to my home to taste the recipes and give their opinions. I realized that wasn’t enough. I needed credibility and experience.

As I surfed the Internet, I happened to come across BellaOnline, and they happened to need a Beer & Brewing Author/Editor. Call it Karma. I wrote four “trial articles,” and they accepted me. Passion was born. Since then, beer has taken me to London three times, Alaska twice, Denver four times, Washington DC, Boston, New York, New Hampshire, Illinois, and Iowa, and it has no limits. I have co-hosted a radio show at the GABF with Tom Dalldorf of Celebrator Beer News, presented beer and food demos at the GABF, Great Alaska Beer & Barley Wine Festival and Women of Alaska Festival, been a judge for the National Beerdrinker of the Year Competition in Denver, been a professional judge at the Great American Beer Festival, appeared on Sirius Satellite Radio, had my photos published in several publications, been interviewed for articles in magazines and newspapers, and attended the James Beard Awards in NYC and the Pilsner Urquell Bartender of the Year Competition as Michael Jackson’s partner. I was deeply torn when Michael passed away on August 30th, 2007, but I realize that I need to continue his legacy – to continue in the world of beer that he created through his dogged persistence throughout 30 years of journalistic writing about beer and whiskey.

What prejudices have you had to overcome?
Prejudices? Hogwash! There are certainly challenges, though. I sometimes encounter women who think they hate beer because the only beer they ever had was Bud Light or Miller – then they tried to jump right into a Robust Porter and were put-off by the unexpected surge of complexity to the taste buds. My solution is to explain that they need to approach it as a gentle immersion into its delights – as if you were exploring seduction with a new lover.

Other challenges: Compressing my time enough to get it all done – finding enough time to write as often as I would like. All the work I have done at BellaOnline has been for passion – not pay, so the “Proper Job” that sustains me and pays my bills also requires that I give it a fair amount of attention.

Any other passions?
I am also a single mother to two young men in their early 20′s, who live under my roof, and are developing their own paths in life. My youngest was in a serious accident 5 years ago, and we are still overcoming some of those
challenges daily. I am a IFR rated pilot with a complex aircraft rating, and love aviation, although I have not flown in several years.

Any parting thoughts?
The passion in the beer industry is unlike any I have ever seen – the sense of community, the love for creating a living product, the joy of sharing. This is a great career – this writing about beer. I love what I do…I really love it.

Carolyn is the Beer and Brewing editor at Bella Online (RSS feed)

Women of the beerosphere: Carrie Miller

March is National Women’s History Month here in the United States. It is an annual celebration of women and their roles in history, sponsored by the National Women’s History Project. As with so much else, the realm of beer seems dominated by men. It is primarily men who are marketed to, primarily men who are the brewers and homebrewers, and primarily men who write about beer. But not entirely. The blogosphere is no different. So, to celebrate Women’s History Month, Hop Talk is taking time out to get to know some of these women.

Carrie Miller

What is your name?
Carrie Miller

What is your location?
New York City, but born and raised in Downingtown, Pennsylvania (there’s something in the water there that makes a good beer-lover)

What is your blog?
The Beer Pirate
http://www.thebeerpirate.com

Do you have a favorite style of beer? What is it?
At one time it was the IPA, but I find that my tastes are constantly changing and evolving. Now I just enjoy flavor! I’ve discovered how hops and malts and other flavors can be friends, and I’m loving it!

How did you come to write a blog about beer?
My boss is a partner in an Internet/multimedia video company called Next New Networks. I came to him and told him that I wanted to start a show where I drove around the country tasting beer at different microbreweries. He told me he wasn’t about to send me frolicking across the country on his dime, but he would sponsor a beer blog. He said – start there and come back to me later. Looking back on it, I realize it was a kind of off the wall request that he took quite well.

What prejudices have you had to overcome?
I don’t know that I’ve really had to overcome prejudices, per se. I mean, people always assume that if you’re a chick you’re into light beer or none at all. I find that doing a blog actually makes for a great conversation piece. People are always impressed and surprised to find that someone like me is into beer. I love surprising people and being just what they expect I’m not.

Any other passions?
I love bevvies! I’m not just passionate about beer, but I also love wine, cocktails, tea, sake, all kinds of stuff. I especially love when drinks or food are surrounded by culture. The way that beer brings people together at the pub, or the prohibition history of a cocktail, or the ritual of japanese sake and tea is all fascinating to me. I also love to cook (and eat). I’m this weird kind of Pirate-Martha-Stewart. I’ll craft a 2-layered boston cream filled cake with meringue buttercream icing and a coordinating paper-mache hand-made dish after having a pint of beer and 2 martinis (it’s way easier to pipe icing after a drink or two).

Any parting thoughts?
People often cut me up because, out of the year or so that I’ve been reviewing and blogging about beer, I’ve only given maybe two or three bad reviews. I think long and hard before I say anything bad about a beer. I work hard at the things I do and when someone tells me they don’t dig it, it hurts. In my opinion, there is no bad micro brew or craft brew as long as someone put some love into it. You can taste the love (really, I know that sounds crazy) in a well-crafted beer. Granted, some beers are stronger and more outstanding than others, but that doesn’t make them bad. When you start to take it too seriously it becomes something different. Heck, I don’t know what I’m doing here and this whole thing has been a learning process. That’s what I want my blog to be. A place where I can taste a beer and we can all learn about it, and maybe some commenters (please comment) can share their input and help me better appreciate and enjoy this magical beverage called beer.

Carrie Miller is The Beer Pirate (RSS feed)

Women of the beerosphere: Beer Molly

March is National Women’s History Month here in the United States. It is an annual celebration of women and their roles in history, sponsored by the National Women’s History Project. As with so much else, the realm of beer seems dominated by men. It is primarily men who are marketed to, primarily men who are the brewers and homebrewers, and primarily men who write about beer. But not entirely. The blogosphere is no different. So, to celebrate Women’s History Month, Hop Talk is taking time out to get to know some of these women.

Beer Molly

What is your name?
Terri Osterfeld, but everyone calls me “Beer Molly” because I like to wear Irish peasant dresses at beer festivals.

What is your location?
San Diego County, California — craft beer capitol of the United States, perhaps the world.

What is your blog?
www.mybeerpix.com

Do you have a favorite style of beer? What is it?
I love a good porter. Chocolate porter if you have it, but just about any porter will do.

How did you come to write a blog about beer?
Living where we do, there’s no lack of selection of great breweries or beer bars. A couple of years ago my husband bought me a phone with a camera on it — something which I’d never wanted. But I started playing with it, and after a while got to like it. When people would call or text me and ask what I was doing, I’d send them a picture of my beer. After I while I started sending the photos unsolicited, and my friends would write back “oh great, a picture of your beer.” To save them my husband put up my beer blog and made it so I could send photos and text directly from my phone. Now no matter where I am I can blog about my beer.

What prejudices have you had to overcome?
Whenever we go to restaurants, beer festivals, pubs or whatever, many guys assume I don’t know anything about beer. It used to be irritating, but now I just laugh it off because I get to hang out with some of the best brewers in the world (I’m Tomme Arthur’s — of Port Brewing / Lost Abbey fame — personal assistant). I get to drink stuff many people only dream of.

Any other passions?
Dachshunds. I have two minis and another blog dedicated to them — www.doxienation.com. Girl thing, I know.

Any parting thoughts?
I think women beer bloggers are a lot more common than you think. I work the tasting room at Port Brewing / Lost Abbey every weekend with my girlfriend, Mojo. We see lots of guys, but almost as many women. I think girls love beer as much as guys, but they don’t get into the technicalities of “oh, this is malty with flavors of bread and apples” type stuff. We’re into the people aspect of beer and enjoy just sitting and talking as much as the beer itself. So while you may not see us on Ratebeer.com, or writing on a strictly beer blog, we’re out there. You just need to look around.

Beer Molly is half of the writing–and photography–team at My Beer Pix (RSS feed)